Organizers

Takashi Miura

Takashi Miura

University of Arizona (Religion)

Takashi Miura’s research focuses on Japanese religions in the early modern and modern periods. He is the author of Agents of World Renewal: The Rise of Yonaoshi Gods in Japan (University of Hawaii Press, 2019). In this book, he examines the spread of the concept of “world renewal” (yonaoshi) in Japanese society from the late eighteenth to early twentieth centuries and highlights the rise of “yonaoshi gods,” a new category of divinities that emerged during this time period. He is currently working on his second book, tentatively titled Venerating the Righteous: Sakura Sogoro and Deified Peasants in Japan, in which he analyzes the practice of “peasant deification” in the early modern period and its impact on subsequent religious practices in Japan. At the University of Arizona, he teaches courses on Japanese religions and Buddhism. He received his B.A. (Religion & Japanese-English Translation) and M.A. (Asian Religions) from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and his Ph.D. (Asian Religions) from Princeton University.

Joshua Schlachet

Joshua Schlachet

University of Arizona (History)

Joshua Schlachet is a historian of early modern and modern Japan, specializing in the cultural history of food and nourishment in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. His current project, “Nourishing Life: Diet, Body, and Society in Early Modern Japan,” examines the emergence of a dietary “common knowledge” as new practical guidebooks circulating among ordinary readers expanded the concept of a well-nourished body to encompass economic productivity, status hierarchy, and moral cultivation. His research interests include global and comparative food studies, histories of science and health, book history and popular publishing, and material culture and artisanship. Schlachet teaches courses on Japanese and East Asian history, dietary cultures, and everyday life. He received his Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Cultures from Columbia University and holds an M.A. (Japanese Studies) from the University of Michigan and B.A. (History) from Cornell University.

Jingyi Li

Jingyi Li

University of Arizona (Graduate Student Organizer)

Jingyi Li is a doctoral student in Pre-modern Japanese literature and history, as well as a University Fellow. She earned her B.A. in Japanese Language and Literature from East China Normal University and M.A. in Pre-modern Japanese Literature from Kyushu University. Her research focuses on Edo period literary history, particularly popular literature. Her current project features intellectual / bunjin communities in the late Edo period. She is also interested in pre-modern Japanese print culture and paleography. Her hobbies are transcribing kuzushiji and cycling.

Our Sponsors

This workshop was made possible thanks to a Faculty Research Grant from the College of Humanities at the University of Arizona. We would also like to extend our gratitude to the Department of East Asian Studies Department, Department of Religious Studies and Classics, and Center for Buddhist Studies for their generous support of our program.

For any questions, please contact Joshua Schlachet at jschlachet@email.arizona.edu